Alexa Glatch Interview

Glatch 255×88

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***Alexa Glatch is an American touring professional on the WTA and ITF Circuit. She enjoyed a very successful junior career, reaching a career high of a combined ranking of 5th in the world in 2005. Later on that year, she suffered an injury after falling off her scooter. She was sidelined for 8 months with a broken wrist and elbow. Returning to tennis, Alexa Glatch had a breakout year on tour in 2009, reaching the third round of Indian Wells and winning her first-ever Grand Slam match at Roland Garros. She continues to strive toward her goal of becoming a Grand Slam Champion.***

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On Court: What makes Alexa Glatch a winner?

My self-discipline gets a mention. I even sometimes over-do it. But I’ve always never had to be told what to do. I believe get that from my mom, she is the exact same way. (Alexa’s mom is the CEO of Fluor Corporation, a top engineering company, and the only woman in upper management.

On Court: I can see by the way you talk about her, your mom is a role model for you. Who else do inspires you/do you aspire to be like?

I liked Steffi Graf, I liked her game and I liked how she let her tennis speak for herself. She was always one of the hardest workers too. Another one would be Bill Parcels, who coached the NY Giants to the SuperBowl, Patriots to the SuperBowl, NY Jets, and my absolute favourite, Dallas Cowboys. He is also known as the Big Tuna, a no bullshit kind-of-guy who got the most out of his players. His image was a hard ass but inside, he was a soft, kind-hearted person.

On Court: I can see how emulate your models in everyday life. Just like Steffi, you let your tennis speak for itself too.
After such an injury, one would say it is fair that you deserve to be called “tenacious”. What was it that kept you going forward at the worst of times?

Rock Star Energy Drink. Just Kidding.
When I initially had my fall of the scooter, my diagnosis was a broken left elbow and 6 weeks of recovery. Shortly after, I had received more devastating news: my right wrist was broken as well, and I had been hitting on it for two days. The slowest healing bone in the body, the scaphoid, was fractured. I was petrified because I was told I might never be able to play tennis again because of possible complications with healing. I was in a cast for 12 weeks and did nothing but ride a bike. Prior to injury, I was playing the best tennis of my life and I was expecting the same level from myself. I jumped too soon, and after a frustrating loss at Pacific Life Open, I came to terms with the fact that tennis is a long road. The most important lesson I learned from that was not to ride scooters at night.

On Court: You and Kevin have a great player/coach relationship, what is it that creates that success?

He puts up with my bullshit. Kevin is so positive and understanding, he allows me to figure things out for myself. We get along great, with a lot of the same interests: basketball, football, going to professional games, being outdoors, etc. It helps that we both on the same page about my game style on the court, too.

On Court: With your all-court creative game, you are considered a rare breed on the women’s tour. What gets your artistic juices flowing? Where do you get your creativity from?

I have been that way ever since I was young. It’s more fun that way, doing the same stuff gets boring quickly. When I was young, I loved watching Hicham Arazi play, the way he created the points. I like being a little different from the other girls on the tour.

On Court: From getting to know you the last couple of months, I know what a passionate person you are. Aside from tennis, what else are you passionate about?

Skim boarding, surfing, throwing the football, baseball, I do it all. Living in Newport Beach means I can do those things year round.I also like writing: stories, fiction, Non-fiction, no poems for me though. I’d also love to get my scuba licence.

On Court: And I have to ask, why do you wear your hair down? Is it a superstition?

Ive gotten so used to it, any other way, I wouldn’t be able to play tennis! I’m also addicted to my hat. Without it, there is too much vision and I see too much, hahaha.

On Court: Did your elastic snap one day and you never looked back?

It all began in Ohio; during an indoor tournament…I didn’t need my hair up, there were no elements and when I returned to Newport, I needed something to put my hair out of my face, so on came the hat. Now I can’t part with it.

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