30-300: Controlling On-Court Emotions

BY BASELINE MEDIA

Emotional control is a vital asset for players but the limited time in which they have to master it greatly intensifies the task. So it becomes not just about a player’s ability to manage their emotions, but manage them quickly. This is where the 30-300 concept comes in. It suggests that the very best players will – more often than not – be able to manage their emotions within 30 to 300 seconds, following the forehand error, double fault or even letting break point slip. It can be what separates the outstanding from the mere brilliant. Subscribe: https://tinyurl.com/BaselineTennis 

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