A New Reality By Nicolas Pereira

Written by: Nicolas Pereira

Nicolás Pereira joined ESPN in 2001 as a play-by-play tennis commentator for ESPN International and ESPN Deportes. Since then he has been covered all four Grand Slams and other major tennis event.Pereira enjoyed a nine-year career as a professional tennis player, entering the pro ranks in 1988 after winning the French Open, Wimbledon and the U.S. Open and becoming the International Tennis Federation Junior World Champion. During his professional tennis career, Pereira compiled a long list of achievements including becoming the #1 Davis Cup Player (Venezuela, 1985-1997), #74 ATP-Ranking, 9 singles and 13 double titles in the ATP Tour, gold medalist in the ’95 Central American Games, silver medalist in ’96 Pan American Games and a participant in ’96 Atlanta Summer Olympics.


After retiring from the court, Pereira began his broadcasting career serving as a commentator for several media outlets including Canal1/ CD7 (Ecuador), Globovision TV/ Meridiano TV (Venezuela), City TV (Columbia), PSN International (Florida). Prior to joining ESPN, Nicolas also served as the official Davis Cup commentator. Pereira is well versed in sports in general and is fluent in Spanish, English, Portuguese, Italian and French.

It is tough to wake up every day and wrap your head around our new reality. Not only, in our immediate surroundings but the world in general.


As sports try to take off for the sake of the fans, as well as of those who compete and all related activities, I find myself pondering about how this will all come to end- or if it ever will.


This past week in the World Team Tennis ‘Bubble” I have seen the efforts to keep everyone safe while carrying on a team competition with around 60/70 players and coaches onsite. Counting organizers, officials, media, and support personnel are around 150 people trying hard to make this happen. I am very impressed by how the strict protocol has been handled and how everyone is invested in making this event a success, but The Open is a completely different scale of details.
As we received news that the Citi Open got cancelled, we are all waiting to see if the US Open will go ahead as planned. There are too many uncertainties and loose ends to clear in the 6 weeks before the start of the biggest Tennis Event in America.


I sincerely hope that the USTA’s plan can be carried out successfully and without hitches, it will take an unprecedented group effort, a tall task for all involved.
As this new reality deepens, uncertainty is present around every corner, one of the only truths that is undeniable is the fact that we have to rely on each other more than ever if we want to go back to some degree of normalcy, while we look back on what we had and learn to appreciate how lucky we are to still have a chance to hope to get sports back.


It is tough to wake up every day and wrap your head around our new reality. Not only, in our immediate surroundings but the world in general.


As sports try to take off for the sake of the fans, as well as of those who compete and all related activities, I find myself pondering about how this will all come to end- or if it ever will.
This past week in the World Team Tennis ‘Bubble” I have seen the efforts to keep everyone safe while carrying on a team competition with around 60/70 players and coaches onsite. Counting organizers, officials, media, and support personnel are around 150 people trying hard to make this happen. I am very impressed by how the strict protocol has been handled and how everyone is invested in making this event a success, but The Open is a completely different scale of details.As we received news that the Citi Open got cancelled, we are all waiting to see if the US Open will go ahead as planned. There are too many uncertainties and loose ends to clear in the 6 weeks before the start of the biggest Tennis Event in America.


I sincerely hope that the USTA’s plan can be carried out successfully and without hitches, it will take an unprecedented group effort, a tall task for all involved.
As this new reality deepens, uncertainty is present around every corner, one of the only truths that is undeniable is the fact that we have to rely on each other more than ever if we want to go back to some degree of normalcy, while we look back on what we had and learn to appreciate how lucky we are to still have a chance to hope to get sports back.

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