Davis Cup #7: “Nestor not ready to retire yet”

When Canadian doubles tennis star Daniel Nestor was playing in the U.S. Open last week, his daughter Tiana was back home in Toronto attending her first day of kindergarten. Like they do almost every day of the 35 weeks Nestor is on the road, the concerned dad and his daughter shared the details of their days via Skype. "(Tiana) is very shy," Nestor said from Belgrade, where Canada will battle Serbia this weekend in a historic Davis Cup semifinal. "She's one of those kids who, if she's somewhere for three hours, the last hour she comes into her own. The first two hours she's not being herself. She definitely needs some pushing and motivation to open up. Hopefully she comes around, because I was like that too. If she's as shy as I was growing up, it will be tough for her.

Photo by: Peter Figura

Written by: Lori Ewing

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When Canadian doubles tennis star Daniel Nestor was playing in the U.S. Open last week, his daughter Tiana was back home in Toronto attending her first day of kindergarten.

Like they do almost every day of the 35 weeks Nestor is on the road, the concerned dad and his daughter shared the details of their days via Skype.

“(Tiana) is very shy,” Nestor said from Belgrade, where Canada will battle Serbia this weekend in a historic Davis Cup semifinal.

“She’s one of those kids who, if she’s somewhere for three hours, the last hour she comes into her own. The first two hours she’s not being herself. She definitely needs some pushing and motivation to open up. Hopefully she comes around, because I was like that too. If she’s as shy as I was growing up, it will be tough for her.

“But she’s a lot better looking than I am, so that should help her,” he added with a laugh.

Modern technology, Nestor said, has made travelling easier. It’s helped the father of two daughters — Tiana will turn five in December, Bianca is six months old — remain on the ATP Tour, where he’s claimed 81 men’s doubles titles, including eight Grand Slams, in a pro career that has spanned more than two decades.

The Toronto native is the oldest regular player on the tour, having turned 41 last week during his 21st consecutive U.S. Open appearance. (No, he didn’t celebrate. “There is nothing about turning 41 worth celebrating,” he joked.)

To view the full article, please go to The Canadian Press

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