Miron Mann: Now and Then

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***27 year old Miron Mann is a former Canadian Junior National Doubles Champion who graduated in 2007 from Utah where he played for four years on a tennis scholarship. He then coached at Hillsboro, junior college in Florida, before joining Richard Hernandez, his long time coach and mentor at Richmond Hill Country Club. Miron was the Under 14 Ontario coach for the Nationals this summer when ONcourt caught up with him.***

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ONcourt: Miron, what is the biggest difference with the Under 14 Nationals now and when you played them over 10 years ago?

Miron Mann: The depth of the field is much better than it used to be. Before you only had to worry about 8 to 10 good players but now there are at least 20 kids who can get in the championship [top 8] flight.

ONcourt: What do you find different now in the development of the players compared to when you were going the system?

Miron Mann: When I used to train, there was no regrouping either with the OTA or Tennis Canada, you trained at your club and got coached by your personal coach. There was also very little emphasis on fitness development compared to what is going on today, especially with the younger players.

ONcourt: You still have an ATP point, do you plan on competing at that level still?

Miron Mann: Last year I went to see the Futures at the Rexall and after talking with the tournament director, I signed up for the tournament, won two qualifying matches and one in the main draw. That is how I got my point. I was not overly impressed with the level of play. Having said that, I still plan on competing but not on the tour, my shoulder could not handle the stress.

ONcourt: If you could start your junior career over, what would you do differently?

Miron Mann: First, I would focus much more on my physical conditioning; it is such an important part of the game now. Second, I would be more coachable and be willing to listen and learn. I also would have used my summer time while I was in college as a time to improve instead of as a time to rest. Finally, I wish I would have believed more, continued improving and pursue the dream of a professional career.

A deeper dive into second serve statistics

The two most widely reported second serve statistics in professional tennis are the number of double faults a player hit, and their second serve winning percentage. If we’re trying to understand the effectiveness of a particular player’s second serve, relying only on those statistics has significant drawbacks. Article by Michal Kokta.

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