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Catching up with Jim Courier

Written by: Mike McIntyre

Featured in: Ontario Tennis Magazine, Fall 2010, p. 10 – 11

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***Originally from Montreal, Quebec, Mike McIntyre has been a tennis fan since watching Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg’s seemingly annual encounters at Wimbledon during his childhood.

Now living in Toronto, he maintains his own tennis website at www.protennisfan.com that extensively follows the ATP Tour. He can also be followed on Twitter at twitter.com/protennisfan***

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If it’s true that life begins at forty then Jim Courier was blessed with quite a head start. Not many professional tennis players get to reap the rewards that Courier achieved during his illustrious career. Before he retired from the ATP Tour in 2000, the American had captured 4 Grand Slams, been the number-one player in the world for 58 weeks, won a total of 23 singles titles, 6 more in doubles and a Davis Cup championship with the United States as well.

Since retirement Courier has stayed closely involved with the sport and has turned himself into a well-respected broadcaster while also promoting and playing on the Champions Tour through his company Inside-Out Sports and Entertainment.

I had the good fortune of catching up with Courier in May while he was in Hamilton to play an exhibition match against John McEnroe. I found Courier to be incredibly articulate and passionate regarding the issues the tennis faces in the 21st century and what needs to be done, both in Canada and abroad, to properly promote the sport.

Here is the revealing Q&A that ensued.

ONTARIO TENNIS MAGAZINE: WHY DO YOU THINK CANADIAN TENNIS PLAYERS SEEM TO HAVE SUCH A DIFFICULT TIME CRACKING THE TOP ONE HUNDRED IN THE GAME?

COURIER: I think that’s a question that a lot of nations, including my own, are asking. Britain is asking that question. Australia is asking that question. Frankly in men’s tennis the only countries not asking that question are probably Argentina, France and Spain. So those are where the real power centres are from a depth perspective right now and it’s a question that I can’t answer. I’m not involved in player development, I don’t know what it really takes out of them. What I’ve experienced from a  political level, from a planning level, there are a lot of passionate, smart people going after it in my country and I’m sure it’s the same here. Some of it comes down to just pure numbers. You need to get the athletes playing your sport and a lot of it can come down to how many of the best athletes in Canada are being introduced to tennis early enough to fall in love with the sport and really dedicate themselves to it. You can answer that one maybe, I can’t

OTM: A LOT OF HOCKEY PLAYERS UP HERE I GUESS.

COURIER: Yeah, I think that’s a struggle that a lot of nations, where tennis isn’t the number one or number two sport, will face.

OTM: HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE CURRENT STATUS OF THE SPORT IN THE U.S.? IN THE 90S THERE WAS YOURSELF AND CHANG, SAMPRAS AND AGASSI WHO WERE REALLY ROLLING ALONG. NOW WITH ANDY RODDICK APPROACHING THIRTY, THE BRYAN BROTHERS GETTING OLDER, THE WILLIAMS SISTERS ARE AROUND THIRTY AS WELL, WHO’S COMING UP OR DO YOU FEEL THAT THERE IS THAT FEAR THAT THE U.S. MIGHT FALL INTO THE CATEGORY OF OTHER NATIONS THAT YOU JUST SPOKE ABOUT?

COURIER: I couldn’t say that there’s a fear there. I’m sure there’s a concern there. I know the USTA has been committing a lot of resources for years to try and assist with player development. But if you’re trying to find the silver bullet it doesn’t really exist. I didn’t start playing tennis because of the Federation. John McEnroe to my knowledge didn’t start playing tennis because of the USTA. I know Andre, I know Pete, I know Michael, I know Lindsay Davenport and the Williams sisters – we all became involved in tennis because our families pushed us into it or opened up that avenue for us.

To some extent it’s a really challenging question because the USTA, Tennis Canada, their role in my mind is to really facilitate once a player gets to a  certain level. To facilitate their transition into being professionals and to be there to give them the assistance, the coaching, the final support that it would require to move into the next phase. But to think from the outside that it’s the role of Tennis Canada to develop and create a champion is probably a very myopic view that’s not rooted in reality.

OTM: IF YOU LOOK AT THE ATP TOUR THESE DAYS, THE GRAND SLAMS ARE STILL BEING MOSTLY WON BY FEDERER AND NADAL. IT SEEMED LIKE LAST YEAR ANDY MURRAY MIGHT CHALLENGE THEM AND WIN THAT FIRST ONE AND INSTEAD IT LOOKS LIKE HE’S TAKEN A STEP BACK PERHAPS?

COURIER: Well he’s been close, I just think that mentally it was tough for him to come so close in Australia, he played so beautifully there. The he came up a little short against Roger, which shouldn’t be a disappointment. It should be understandable at very least – of course it’s disappointing not to win.

OTM: WHAT ABOUT NOVAK DJOKOVIC – IS HE TURNING INTO THE NEXT MARAT SAFIN OR DOES HE HAVE THE GOODS?

COURIER: I think Novak is as talented as Marat and Marat certainly had his time when he won a couple of majors and I think Novak will be very strong eventually. I think having a coaching transition, where he and Todd Martin are no longer working together, may take a little bit of time for him to absorb and come back from, but ultimately his skills are intact and it’s a question of just putting it all together. He’s obviously extremely gifted.

OTM: IF JIM COURIER WAS COMMISSIONER OF THE ATP TOUR, IF SUCH A POSITION EXISTED, WHAT KIND OF CHANGES MIGHT YOU MAKE TO THE WAY THE GAME IS BEING PLAYED AND MARKETED AT THE MOMENT?

COURIER: Well, commissioner of the ATP Tour does exist, it’s a CEO job, but that job is one of many leadership roles in tennis and what you need to really effect any change is to be the major domo of tennis and not have to worry about the political implications and also to have the freedom to manipulate the schedule to the point where the financial implications of that wouldn’t be on you. So if you wipe tournaments off you can’t be sued by them.

There are  a lot of political issues and scheduling and contractual issues that make it impractical to make a clean slate and say we’re going to build a logical tennis season for the fans to follow, for the players to follow and have a true off season which will increase the longevity of their careers and for a media package to be sold which funds everything. That’s what you need. There’s no one position that would enable someone to do that right now with impunity. But if you could be that person for a day you’d wipe the schedule completely clean.

OTM: JUST BLOW IT UP AND START BRAND NEW?

COURIER: Blow the whole thing wide open and say this is where it makes sense for the majors to be positioned, this is where it makes sense for the major ATP and WTA events to be positioned, this is how Davis Cup and Fed Cup make sense – they don’t make sense at all right now – they are a wildly undervalued asset in tennis. How do we make this better from a fan and media perspective because that’s what funds the sport. They are the revenue streams; your sponsors, your television and your fan base – those are your meal tickets so how do you keep them as interested as they can possibly be.

Sounds easy right? Well it’s unbelievably complicated and that’s why nothing really changes. It’s not because there aren’t people who don’t want it to be better, it’s because there are so many different factors and factions in there that have a financial stake and have invested in it.

I mean, how would Tennis Canada feel? They put in the money – they’ve gone out and raised the money. I don’t know how they’ve funded building these beautiful stadiums and they’ve got cherry positions on the calendar, they’ve got great fields here. How would they feel if they just got wiped away and were told, ‘you know what, Canada doesn’t make any sense in our schedule, we’re gonna shrink the tour, we’re not coming to Canada anymore.” And that’s realistically what we would be talking about doing, and then Tennis Canada would be holding the bag going “wait, we’ve been here we’ve been supporting tennis for thirty years and you’re telling us to piss off.” Well that’s what you’d need to have the freedom to do. So that’s just a small example of why it’s so easy to talk about it and why it’s so challenging in reality to make it work.

OTM: ARE YOU INTERESTED IN GETTING INTO THAT ASPECT OF GROWING THE GAME OR ARE YOU QUITE CONTENT WITH THE BROADCASTING THAT YOU’RE DOING AND THESE TYPES OF EVENTS AS WELL, LIKE THE CHAMPIONS TOUR?

COURIER: Well, I mean I’ve put my money where my mouth is. My company owns and operates the Champions series. So I started the Champions Tour and have run it and played on it for the last five years with my business partner and my company. I’ve been involved in some of those types of scenarios, so I’ve got a little bit of a clearer view on what the business of tennis looks like now that I didn’t have before. If there was a way to stay involved in the game and be impactful and do something that I think can help the sport I’m certainly interested in it. I’ve committed myself to being involved in the sport of tennis as much as possible so far in my life and I see no reason why that would change.

A New Reality By Nicolas Pereira

This past week in the World Team Tennis ‘Bubble” I have seen the efforts to keep everyone safe while carrying on a team competition with around 60/70 players and coaches onsite. Counting organizers, officials, media, and support personnel are around 150 people trying hard to make this happen. I am very impressed by how the strict protocol has been handled and how everyone is invested in making this event a success, but The Open is a completely different scale of details.

ONcourt Interviews NGTL Co-Founder Yves Boulais

It does not matter that you get your rating playing locally or that you had spent an insidious amount of money playing the ITF junior tour tournaments. Your rating is your level of play (you get no bonus for playing more or playing far away). This allows us to break free of the ITF competitive structure potentially saving us time, money, and headache. We see this as a great opportunity to improve the logistic of our sport.

Brandon Burke (son of ACE President Doug Burke) Elected to WTA Board

As revealed in a recent news release issued by the WTA Tour – Brandon Burke has been elected to the WTA Board of Directors (to start officially in September). Oncourt got together with Brandon to delve a bit more into his background and to gain some insight into this wonderful appointment he has attained at such a young age.