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The Tennis Space: “Roger Federer’s mother Lynette on ‘How to be a tennis parent’”

12. February 2014

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The Tennis Space: “Roger Federer’s mother Lynette on ‘How to be a tennis parent’”

Exclusive tips from Roger Federer’s mother Lynette on ‘How to be a tennis parent’. It’s important that the child enjoys the game and isn’t forced into it. “I believe a child chooses tennis because he or she is attracted and fascinated by the sport, and that could be through the parents, friends or family."

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Allistair McCaw: “70% of Talented Kids Drop Out of Their Sport Before Age 13″

24. January 2014

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Allistair McCaw: “70% of Talented Kids Drop Out of Their Sport Before Age 13″

The reality is, 70% of all kids quit organized sports by the age of 13, and the number one reason they cite is that it is not fun anymore. Personally, having been around the sports world for over 30 years now, growing up as a kid, competing professionally for 10 years, and now coaching, I have seen this first hand. There can be a few reasons why kids drop out early:

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Stefanie Mullen: “10 Things Parents of Athletes Need to Know”

20. December 2013

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Stefanie Mullen: “10 Things Parents of Athletes Need to Know”

I have seen some things on the sidelines over the years that would give you nightmares. Casts being sawed off, coaches going to blows, parents screaming obscenities at the other teams fans. U.G.L.Y. We have all gotten way too emotionally involved in our kids sports. We have forgotten that it’s about the the kids and the lessons, the journey if you will, not the end point.I have an 18 year old now. He is playing D1 lacrosse for an east coast college and I couldn’t be prouder of him. My 16 yo is committed to a college on the east coast to play as well in 2015. One thing I know for sure is this. They did it. Not us. No amount of screaming, calling coaches, forcing practices would have mattered if they didn’t want it. It was our goal to be supportive, try and embarrass them as little as possible and give them the tools they needed to achieve their dreams. But they had to fight for those dreams. Not us.

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Changing the Game Project: “Our Biggest Mistake: Talent Selection Instead of Talent Identification”

20. December 2013

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Changing the Game Project: “Our Biggest Mistake: Talent Selection Instead of Talent Identification”

Many youth sports coaches claim to be great talent identifiers, and point to the results of their 11 year all star team as proof. Yet they are not talent identifiers. They are talent selectors. The difference could not be more striking, or more damaging to our country’s future talent pool in many sports.

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Wayne Elderton: “AceCoach e-Newsletter December 2013″

17. December 2013

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Wayne Elderton: “AceCoach e-Newsletter December 2013″

Timing is Everything: As a complement to the videos featured this month, this newsletter will explore the element of timing. If you were to force me to pick the most important technical element in tennis, that would be challenging. There are many elements that would compete for the title. All would have good rationale. For example footwork/movement would be up at the top of the list. If one can’t get to the ball, they can’t do anything with it. I guess the debate would be if footwork/movement is ‘technical’.

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Allen Fox: “Relaxation Helps Power and Speed”

16. December 2013

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Allen Fox: “Relaxation Helps Power and Speed”

I was watching a show on ESPN about famed pro football coach, Bill Walsh, who was particularly notable for his success in producing great quarterbacks (Joe Montana, San Francisco 49er Hall of Famer, amongst others). In describing Walsh’s techniques, one young quarterback told of how Walsh stood directly behind him in an early practice session and kept telling him to throw the ball “easier.” As he mastered the ability, under pressure, to throw the ball “easier,” the young man commented that it made his passes more accurate in addition to making the ball easier for his receivers to catch. What, you may ask, does this have to do with tennis? A great deal, it turns out.

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