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Michael Emmett: “Europeans Are Dominating on Both Tours”

12. February 2014

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Michael Emmett: “Europeans Are Dominating on Both Tours”

The rise of talented tennis players from all over Europe has been on display for some time now on the WTA Tour and the ATP tour. But never has it been more apparent than at the 2014 Australian Open. With the first major of the season now in the books it is very apparent that the ‘old’ days of the USA and Australia dominating the Grand Slams are long gone. Tennis is being dominated by the Europeans and the numbers are staggering.

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The Tennis Space: “Roger Federer’s mother Lynette on ‘How to be a tennis parent’”

12. February 2014

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The Tennis Space: “Roger Federer’s mother Lynette on ‘How to be a tennis parent’”

Exclusive tips from Roger Federer’s mother Lynette on ‘How to be a tennis parent’. It’s important that the child enjoys the game and isn’t forced into it. “I believe a child chooses tennis because he or she is attracted and fascinated by the sport, and that could be through the parents, friends or family."

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Allistair McCaw: “70% of Talented Kids Drop Out of Their Sport Before Age 13″

24. January 2014

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Allistair McCaw: “70% of Talented Kids Drop Out of Their Sport Before Age 13″

The reality is, 70% of all kids quit organized sports by the age of 13, and the number one reason they cite is that it is not fun anymore. Personally, having been around the sports world for over 30 years now, growing up as a kid, competing professionally for 10 years, and now coaching, I have seen this first hand. There can be a few reasons why kids drop out early:

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Changing the Game Project: “Our Biggest Mistake: Talent Selection Instead of Talent Identification”

20. December 2013

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Changing the Game Project: “Our Biggest Mistake: Talent Selection Instead of Talent Identification”

Many youth sports coaches claim to be great talent identifiers, and point to the results of their 11 year all star team as proof. Yet they are not talent identifiers. They are talent selectors. The difference could not be more striking, or more damaging to our country’s future talent pool in many sports.

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Sportsnet: “Q&A: Bouchard on Big 2013, Role Model Status”

5. December 2013

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Sportsnet: “Q&A: Bouchard on Big 2013, Role Model Status”

Sportsnet magazine’s 2013 Awards issue hits newsstands today. And, to nobody’s surprise, 19-year old tennis star Eugenie Bouchard was named Breakout Athlete of the Year. In her first full year on the WTA tour, the native of Westmount, Que., was named the tour’s Newcomer of the Year and jumped 112 spots in the world rankings, finishing an eventful season at No. 32—the highest-ranked teenager on the planet. We recently caught up with Bouchard at the Tennis Canada’s headquarters in Toronto.

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Allen Fox: “Never Allow Your Opponent To Obtain Momentum”

6. November 2013

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Allen Fox: “Never Allow Your Opponent To Obtain Momentum”

Points tend to be won and lost in streaks. This happens because the players winning them start to feel good and play better while the players losing them start to feel bad and play worse. When the game is going against you there is a natural tendency to rush around, make errors, and not play points one at a time with sufficient diligence to arrest the slide. Allowing your opponents to get “hot” like this opens you up to losing a lot of games in a hurry, so you want to do everything in your power to disrupt their momentum as quickly as possible. Slow down when you are behind. Your first thought, when points start to tumble against you, should be to slow the match down. I’m not suggesting you become deliberately disruptive and unsportsmanlike by strolling around stalling and tying your shoes. I just mean you should take a few extra seconds between points to gather yourself together and allow your opponent to wait a little and think.

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